Side Impact Collisions: Discover The 6 Things That Makes These Some of The Most Dangerous Accidents

Side Impact Collisions

Updated 10/02/20 – Published by: Igor Shapiro

Any form of vehicle accident can result in significant injury or even death. Side impact collisions are particularly severe since the sufferer is generally exposed to more danger than head-on or rear-end collisions. And, in many circumstances, injuries incurred in a side impact collisions may not be noticeable right away.

What Exactly Are Side Impact Collisions?

Side impact collisions occur when two vehicles collide at approximately a 90-degree angle. Unlike a head-on or rear-end collision, side impact collisions occurs when one vehicle meets the doors on one side of the other car. Such collisions are sometimes referred to as “broadside” or “T-bone” collisions, the latter alluding to the shape the two cars take when they collide.

Intersections are the most common location for side impact collisions. Driver A, for example, is legally passing through an intersection. Simultaneously, Driver B, coming in the opposite direction, runs the red light at the junction and collides with the side of Driver A’s car.

What Makes Side Impact Collisions So Dangerous?

Modern automobiles and trucks are built to resist most of the head-on or rear-end collision force. In other words, if you are hit head-on, your bumper, engine, and driver’s side airbag–along with the “crumple zones” of the other vehicle–will absorb a significant amount of the kinetic energy from the collision, presumably limiting any injuries to you and your passengers. However, in the event of a side impact collision, you usually are only protected by the door and glass.

Side impact collisions can also force the impacted car to spin or flip over. Additional collisions with other vehicles, people, and even stationary objects such as buildings may result from this. In comparison to any other type of accident, you are considerably more likely to endure the full force of side impact collisions even if the incident occurs at a relatively moderate speed.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s most recent figures, side-impact incidents account for around 25% of fatal car accidents. In 2015, the most recent year for which complete data is available, 5,593 persons died in side impact collisions across the country. Most of these deaths (about 3,800) happened in automobiles, with the remainder split between trucks and sport-utility vehicles.

Types of injuries that are expected:

    • Spinal and neck injuries. Whiplash is caused by a sudden and quick movement of the neck. When you’re in an automobile accident, your head stays still at the time of contact. As a result, the majority of the energy is absorbed by your neck. Neck ligaments and muscles are stretched. Your head eventually “catches up” with your neck, pulling it back in the other direction. All of this can cause significant harm to the spine. 
    • Traumatic brain injuries. A concussion is a fancy way of stating traumatic brain damage, and whiplash can cause one. A concussion can be caused by any blunt force contact to the head, such as if your head hits the steering wheel or a window during an accident. Catastrophic brain damage may not be visible right away. It’s possible that you won’t lose consciousness, and the consequences of your cognitive functioning won’t be known for hours, days, or even weeks after the event.
    • Injuries to limbs. In side impact collisions, limbs are frequently smashed into the door, the dashboard, or even other seats in the car, resulting in broken bones. Some limb injuries, like brain traumas, are not immediately detectable. Possibly, you won’t notice any symptoms for an extended period.
    • Chest injuries. Finally, bruising or contusions to the chest may occur in side impact collisions. Most of the time, these are only minor wounds, and however, they could indicate broken ribs or possibly internal bleeding, both of which would demand surgery.

Are my injuries the fault of the other driver?

    • Spinal and neck injuries. Whiplash is caused by a sudden and quick movement of the neck. When you’re in an automobile accident, your head stays still at the time of contact. As a result, the majority of the energy is absorbed by your neck. Neck ligaments and muscles are stretched. Your head eventually “catches up” with your neck, pulling it back in the other direction. All of this can cause significant harm to the spine.
    • Traumatic brain injuries. A concussion is a fancy way of stating traumatic brain damage, and whiplash can cause one. A concussion can be caused by any blunt force contact to the head, such as if your head hits the steering wheel or a window during an accident. Catastrophic brain damage may not be visible right away. It’s possible that you won’t lose consciousness, and the consequences of your cognitive functioning won’t be known for hours, days, or even weeks after the event.
    • Injuries to limbs. In side impact collisions, limbs are frequently smashed into the door, the dashboard, or even other seats in the car, resulting in broken bones. Some limb injuries, like brain traumas, are not immediately detectable. Possibly, you won’t notice any symptoms for an extended period.
    • Chest injuries. Finally, bruising or contusions to the chest may occur in side impact collisions. Most of the time, these are only minor wounds, and however, they could indicate broken ribs or possibly internal bleeding, both of which would demand surgery.

Are my injuries the fault of the other driver?

    • Inside-impact car accidents, knowing who had the right of way is crucial. As previously stated, these types of collisions typically occur when one driver disregards traffic signals or the other’s legal and superior right to be in the intersection. In many circumstances, determining this is relatively straightforward. Indeed, if the fault is evident, the responsible motorist may accept it.

      However, if the scenario becomes a “he said, she said” situation, you must take the following actions to preserve any evidence that could be used to prove the other driver’s liability:

      • Call the police. Even if you and the other motorist do not immediately argue about who is responsible, you should always acquire an official police report of the accident.
      • Take pictures. Fortunately, thanks to smartphones, almost everyone now has a high-resolution camera in their pockets. Take pictures of your damaged vehicle and any skid marks on the road. This can be useful in reconstructing the disaster later on.
      • Locate witnesses. List down the names and contact information of those who witnessed the accident. As soon as the police come on the scene, make sure they talk with them.

Insurance Companies to Deal With

If the other motorist admits fault, their insurance company may be willing to offer you a speedy settlement to avoid a personal injury lawsuit. The first offer from an insurer should always be viewed with caution. Keep in mind that the insurer is there to safeguard their insured and themselves, not you.

And because many significant injuries, like whiplash or concussions, may not be detected for many weeks following side impact collisions, settling quickly is frequently a terrible choice. Allowing the other driver’s insurance company to coerce you into accepting a settlement that may not adequately compensate you for your injuries is not a good idea.

As part of the Law Office of Igor A. Shapiro, we fight back and battle to obtain you the best settlement  possible and get you the maximum compensation for your pain & suffering. Just a few clicks on our website or a quick phone call and you can get this done for you process started. Contact us today 425-264-2000

Call Now ButtonCall Now